Dashain pic
Maa Durga

Dussehra or Vijayadashmi is commonly known as Dashain. The festival of victory over evil represents the victory of the goddess Durga.

It is widely celebrated among Hindus in Nepal and the North-Eastern states of India. It is the longest and the most auspicious festival celebrated by Hindus throughout the globe. It falls in September or October starting from the Shukla paksha (bright lunar night) of the month of Ashwin and ending on Purnima, the full moon.

History about Dashain:

It was historically celebrated from different parts of the world and different parts of the country. According to Hindu Mythology, The Mahisasur had gained the boon that no man could kill him. He waged war against Indra(King of Heaven). As he had got boon no man could kill him so he came to win the war and captured heaven.

After that, all the gods, escape from heaven and hide in mountains. They called goddess Durga to kill the demon Mahisasur. Durga led a battle against Mahisasur by riding on a lion. After a long battle of ten days, the goddess Durga killed Mahisasur.

Significance:

Hence, she is also known as Mahishasuramardini. Mahishasuramardini means the victory of Durga over Mahisasur.

  • It represents the victory of good over bad.
  • This festival also symbolizes the victory of Ram over Ravan as recounted in the Ramayana.

Day 1: Ghatasthapana

It means the beginning of Dashain. GhaŠĻ≠asthapana falls on the first day of the festival. On this day the Kalash is filled with holy water and is then sewn with barley seeds. This ritual is performed at a certain auspicious time which is determined by the astrologers. The goddess is believed to reside in the vessel during Navaratri.

Day 7: Phulpati

Traditionally, on this day the Kalash, Jamara, and sugar cane are tied with red cloth. It’s a major celebration occurring on the seventh day of Dashain.

Day 8: Maha Asthami

The eighth day is called Maha Asthami. The night of this day is called Kal Ratri. On this day the most fierce of Goddess Durga’s manifestations, the bloodthirsty Kali, is appeased through the sacrifice of goats in temples throughout the nation. Blood, which means symbolic of its fertility, is offered to the Goddesses.

Day 9: Maha Navami

The ninth day is called maha Navami. This is the last day of Navaratri. Ceremonies and rituals reach a peak on this day as the god of creation, are worshipped on this day.

Day 10: Vijayadashami

The tenth day of the festival is called the “Vijayadashami”.On this day, people eat rice and yogurt. vermilion is prepared on this day, also known as “Tika” which symbolizes the blood that ties the family together.

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